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Seats of Influence
Go to: Djerassi's Q/A


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Spacious office for expansive inventor


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Djerassi's office is located on the Stanford University Campus near the intersection of Campus Dr. and Roth way. Inside buidling Stauffer I, Djerassi has a spacious working environment consisting of a rectangular meeting table, a couch, a desk, and numerous works of art.

Dr. Djerassi's first floor office looks as if it were decorated in the late sixties and hasn't been touched since. The contrast between the bright red chairs and the white of the rest of the room makes it appear the set decorator from "2001: A Space Odessy" had a hand in choosing the furniture.

Maybe that's not to far from the truth. Djerassi has a weakness for Science Ficion. Not only is he an avid patron of the arts but he's a science fiction writer himself. Check out his web site at www.djerassi.com and read some samples of his work.


Pill's architect a Rennaisance man

Djerassi was interviewed by Jill Wolfson of the San Jose Mercury News and student interviewer Jay Chien. For the full interview click here.

Q Chien: The first thing I was told about you is that you are a science-fiction writer. Is that right?

A Djerassi: Terrible, terrible, terrible! I will never forgive you. It is science in fiction. I had never written a single word of fiction, never written a single poem, never written any non-scientific prose until I was past 60 years old. . . .

You may ask why I decided to write. Because I wanted to lead one more very different intellectual life, and to a scientist, nothing is more different that writing fiction. Fiction is where you can supposedly invent anything; as a scientist, you are not supposed to make up anything. I mean, you can invent if it is a true invention, but you can't make up something. It is either true or it is false. There is no such thing as truth or falsehood in fiction. Everything is permitted.


Go to: Djerassi's Q/A